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Posted: October 10, 2021

Volunteers plant endangered trees in Crowsnest Pass

The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) recently worked with a few volunteers and the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation of Canada to plant endangered trees on a NCC property in the Crowsnest Pass.

“We planted limber pines, an endangered species that is dying out due to blister-rust infection. However, the seedlings we planted are resistant to the blister-rust fungus,” noted Jensen Edwards, NCC’s National Media Relations Manager.

Volunteers Joan Blair, left, and Wolf Holzmann, right, pose beside a limber pine seedling they planted on Oct. 1 at an NCC property in the Crowsnest Pass.

Jodie Krakowski, from the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation of Canada (standing), and Christina Kelland, a volunteer, work together to plant a limber pine seedling.

The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is the nation’s leading private, not-for-profit land conservation organization, working to protect our most important natural areas and the species they sustain. Since 1962, NCC has helped protect 14 million hectares (35 million acres), coast to coast to coast. In Alberta, 445,000 hectares (1.1 million acres) of the province’s most ecologically significant land and water has been conserved.

To learn more, visit natureconservancy.ca.

Lead image: A crew of volunteers and representatives from the Nature Conservancy of Canada and the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation of Canada set about planting endangered limber pines at an NCC property in the Crowsnest Pass on Oct. 1.  Photos submitted

Nature Conservancy of Canada


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